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Change Healthcare data breach


We are aware Change Healthcare has confirmed data was compromised in its February cyber incident.

Highmark is working with Change and United HealthGroup to fully understand the nature and extent of the impact on our members and customers. We will continue to support our members as more information becomes available.

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Break the Stigma of Mental Health

As problematic as stigma is to our mental health, there is a lot we can do--individually and collectively--to break down this barrier. There are actions we can take to help ourselves and those we love open up about mental health challenges and find appropriate care.

Negative impacts of stigma

Only about 40% of those in need of mental health treatment receive care due to stigma, lack of accessible providers, financial challenges and other barriers.

  • Feelings of shame and isolation
  • Prejudice and discrimination
  • Fear, mistrust, and violence against people who are suffering
  • Reduced motivation to engage in self-care or seek help
  • 32 days/year of lost productivity in the workplace

Break the stigma of mental health by understanding where it lives

Language: Terms like “crazy” or “insane” feed into false stereotypes. Try to use other words, and call out these words when you see them.

Media: Coverage of mental health challenges is sometimes incorrect or sensationalized. Use a critical eye when evaluating media, correct negative stereotypes, and start a dialogue that is sensitive to the actual people behind these stories.

Culture: Historically, people with mental health challenges have been marginalized. Look for ways to highlight and support people who experience mental health challenges.

Families: When it comes to mental health treatment, some family members may express criticism or lack of understanding about the positive effects. This can decrease the likelihood of their loved one seeking help. Try to educate them, but don’t let them stop you from getting the support you deserve.

Self: People living with a mental health challenge sometimes internalize common stereotypes and language around their conditions, resulting in negative perceptions of self and abilities (shame). Work with a therapist to unpack these thoughts and feelings in a healthy way.

Making changes to break the stigma of mental health

Educating ourselves: Understanding the experiences and outcomes of mental health conditions is the first step to recognizing how we can connect to the person suffering. Research is always being conducted, and we must be open to the way the field is changing so that we can always be in the best position to help others.

Promoting open discussions: No one should suffer in silence. Sharing experiences, educating on the facts, and challenging incorrect information can be helpful in combatting stigma.

Paying attention to language: Words play a big role in stigmatizing someone and disparaging terms can lead to feelings of shame or inadequacy.

Encouraging equal treatment of physical and mental health: Looking at mental health treatment in the same way we would approach a physical ailment can help people understand that there is more commonality than difference and increase equal access to care.

Calling out stigmatizing media: Highlight when movies or shows incorrectly portray individuals with mental health challenges.

Being supportive: Overall, lending an ear, an open mind, and a strong shoulder is how we aim to move the conversation forward.

Building a better future

Here are some of our goals when it comes to breaking the stigma of mental health.

  • Raise awareness about mental health
  • Invest in clinician awareness and education
  • Innovate and centralize referrals and points of entry to care to improve access and engagement

Are you or a loved one in crisis?

Are you or a loved one in crisis?

If you think you have a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. Call or text 988 (TTY 711) or visit the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline for 24-hour, toll-free, confidential support for you or your loved ones.

If you think you have a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. Call or text 988 (TTY 711) or visit the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline for 24-hour, toll-free, confidential support for you or your loved ones.